eating disorders

Wider Mental Health Perspective on Eating Disorders, Depression & Anxiety

Check out this fantastic article from Beyond Blue on the National Eating Disorders Collaboration website.

It has links to a great factsheet and also a new beyondblue ‘how to have a conversation’ webpage.  The link is below.

PACE is a recommended organisation to contact for help on the factsheet

Click here to check out the article.

An excellent resource on resilience and sharing the struggle….

Image_Useful_WebsitesEd Miller of Honi Soit has produced this excellent article on resilience and sharing the struggle of Eating Disorder recovery.

‘For eight years, Kate’s eating disorder has been a daily feature of her life. In the last three months, however, following a period of determined treatment, I can count the number of days that have gone badly on just my fingers.’

Hear more about the journey…

Online videos for eating disorder recovery

The National Eating Disorder Association, based in the US, have a range of short video interviews available on their website. In these short video clips, individuals who are in recovery get a minute to share some key insight and advice from their experiences and their recovery journey. Check out some of the videos and find out more about the challenges of living day to day with an eating disorder.

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/NEDANETWORK/videos

 

 

PACEtv Goes Live

The PACE team have recently launched the first two episodes of their brand new multimedia program PACEtv.

The new online documentary series aims to help South Australians with Panic Anxiety, Obsessive Compulsive and Eating Disorders.

“PACEtv will provide individuals, families and communities real life guidance, insight and hope from individuals and families who have made the journey to recovery,” says PACE Manager Chris Chalubek.

“We have interviewed individuals, families and professionals to create video resources that offer experiences of hope and recovery in their own words and highlight the power of lived experience.”

Heather Nowak, featured in the first documentary, talks of her OCD that emerged in her early teens and went away in her late teens. It then returned when she was in her mid 20s after the birth of her first daughter.

“I would have a list of things by my bed of what I had to clean the next day which included 20-30 showers,” she says.

Her list included washing doorframes, floors and beds. If she had to go out the cleaning would take her 7-8 hours. With the help of an understanding GP and mental health nurse she began her road to recovery.

“While everyone has a way of helping, it is about finding the person who connects to you,” Heather says.

The first two episodes focus on panic anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, with later episodes to focus on eating disorder recovery and the experience of friends and relatives.

 

Watch the videos at https://vimeo.com/centacare

Great resources for monitoring your recovery progress…

Our peer workers are always finding new resources from right around the world to help with managing recovery. One great place to find useful resources for tracking your recovery progress is:

http://www.getselfhelp.co.uk/freedownloads2.htm

They have stacks of therapy worksheets and CBT tools which you can download and use to track your recovery.

They have worksheets for tracking your daily mood, personal wellness, social anxiety, panic attacks and eating. They even have worksheets for crisis management, and for establishing and tracking your goals.

So if you’re looking to do some planning with your future wellness, record your success with a particular challenge or simply just keep track your daily mood, there’s loads of useful material.

Check it out!

PACE at the UniSA Campus Day

Members of the PACE team will be at the UniSA Campus Day this Friday March 21st in Adelaide. Festivities begin from 12pm onwards so if you’re in the city and want to come down and find out more about PACE services then you can come and check out our booth at UniSA City East Campus.

We’ll have stacks of information about our services for panic anxiety, generalized anxiety, eating disorders, OCD, social anxiety and hoarding disorder. Come and find out more.

See you there!

The Difference Between Pressure and Stress

The words pressure and stress are often used interchangeably, but do they actually mean the same thing?

When I think of pressure, I think of working under a set of demands that are stimulating and designed to stretch my abilities. Having this pressure on me to succeed is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it’s that feeling that I need to rise to the challenge and push myself further that often helps me achieve my goals, and I couldn’t do that with out some degree of pressure.

So how does this differ from the experience of stress?

Sometimes, when we’re under a lot of pressure, the demands that are placed on us by our situation can exceed our ability to cope effectively. When we reach this point, when we start to feel overstretched or strained by the demands placed upon us, that’s when we begin to drift into the realm of stress.

When trying to manage the challenge of recovery from anxiety, OCD or an eating disorder, being able to recognise the difference between pressure and stress can be a key skill to master.

So next time you’re facing a demanding set of circumstances, take a moment to reflect on what it is you’re facing and ask yourself: is this pressure or is this stress? Can I cope with the demands placed on me, and will those demands help me perform at my best, or do I need to ask for help or take a step back?

It’s good to set expectations for yourself. When we have a goal to work towards, the pressure association with achieving that goal can help us stay on track and fulfill our potential – this is a good thing! But if the demands we are placing on ourselves are exceeding our ability to cope, then stress and even anxiety can soon start to dictate our mood.

That’s when we need to learn to assert ourselves, and say ‘no!’

Tom. S

Starved for a Cure

ABC Radio National have produced a fascinating radio documentary piece looking at the experience of eating disorder recovery and looking at a new treatment approach from Hawaii.

You can download the this current affairs documentary in full at the following address:

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/currentaffairsspecials/radio-current-affairs-documentary3a-starved-of-a-cure/5159108

Body Image Movement – ‘What’s it all about?’

Body Image Movement

www.bodyimagemovement.com.au

So what is The Body Image Movement?

Well, in their own words, it’s a movement to ‘recognize and value real beauty from the inside out.’ The Body Image Movement aims to harness and ‘facilitate positive body image activism, including encouraging women to be more accepting of who they are, to talk a positive body language’ (about themselves and others) with a priority on health before beauty.

Sound like something you might be interested in hearing more about? Well you can find out more at their website, or by visiting their Facebook page.

And let’s get behind the movement for positive body image in Australia.

Eating Disorder Festive Season Checklist

Festive season checklist

We understand Christmas and the holiday period can be a difficult time for some. It is important to remember planning and communication is the key. To help you cope with the stresses of this busy season we’ve come up with a check list you can follow to reduce the likelihood of feeling overwhelmed.

In the lead up to Christmas and New Year:

  • Don’t be scared to say ‘No’ to invitations if you are feeling overwhelmed.
  • Socialise with trusted friends & family prior to Christmas.  Where possible, do this over a meal or snack to help prepare you for Christmas gatherings.
  • Discuss with someone you trust how to cope with family interaction by predicting and preparing for social activities.
  • Predict likely questions from family and friends you haven’t seen for a while and prepare some responses.
  • Plan what you will do to give yourself ‘time out’ from the crowd – perhaps listen to music, going for a walk with a friend or family member, sitting in the sunshine.

When eating out

  • Take time to plan and to think about who will be present and what food is likely to be served.
  • If you don’t know what food will be served ask the person who will be preparing the meal, or ask a family member to find out for you to reduce your anxiety.
  • Offer to take ‘safe’ food to share so you feel comfortable knowing there is something you can eat.
  • Focus on enjoying the company of companions rather than what you are eating.
  • Many people overeat on Christmas Day and often comment on the quantity they have  so remember these comments are not aimed at you.

Communication

Communication reduces holiday stress.  We all know how busy life gets in that hectic period around Christmas each year. For many families the changed routines and extra day to day activities means less time to talk and listen to one another. Ironically, effective communication is a perfect coping mechanism for families to deal with the holiday season’s increased stresses.

  • Effective communication requires
    • Concentration
    •  Tolerance
    •  Rephrasing
    •  Sensitivity when listening and
    •  Ability to express your own thoughts and feelings. Ask yourself how you feel so that you can state your message as clearly, honestly and constructively as possible.
    • Take the time to talk. Whether you’re driving, wrapping gifts, or doing household chores it is important to maintain communication in order to help create a memorable and pleasant holiday experience for the entire family.

(Adapted by Mary P and Lisa H, from Eating Disorders Victoria December 2011 and 2012 Newsletters)