Panic Anxiety

PACEtv Goes Live

The PACE team have recently launched the first two episodes of their brand new multimedia program PACEtv.

The new online documentary series aims to help South Australians with Panic Anxiety, Obsessive Compulsive and Eating Disorders.

“PACEtv will provide individuals, families and communities real life guidance, insight and hope from individuals and families who have made the journey to recovery,” says PACE Manager Chris Chalubek.

“We have interviewed individuals, families and professionals to create video resources that offer experiences of hope and recovery in their own words and highlight the power of lived experience.”

Heather Nowak, featured in the first documentary, talks of her OCD that emerged in her early teens and went away in her late teens. It then returned when she was in her mid 20s after the birth of her first daughter.

“I would have a list of things by my bed of what I had to clean the next day which included 20-30 showers,” she says.

Her list included washing doorframes, floors and beds. If she had to go out the cleaning would take her 7-8 hours. With the help of an understanding GP and mental health nurse she began her road to recovery.

“While everyone has a way of helping, it is about finding the person who connects to you,” Heather says.

The first two episodes focus on panic anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, with later episodes to focus on eating disorder recovery and the experience of friends and relatives.

 

Watch the videos at https://vimeo.com/centacare

PACE at the UniSA Campus Day

Members of the PACE team will be at the UniSA Campus Day this Friday March 21st in Adelaide. Festivities begin from 12pm onwards so if you’re in the city and want to come down and find out more about PACE services then you can come and check out our booth at UniSA City East Campus.

We’ll have stacks of information about our services for panic anxiety, generalized anxiety, eating disorders, OCD, social anxiety and hoarding disorder. Come and find out more.

See you there!

The Difference Between Pressure and Stress

The words pressure and stress are often used interchangeably, but do they actually mean the same thing?

When I think of pressure, I think of working under a set of demands that are stimulating and designed to stretch my abilities. Having this pressure on me to succeed is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, it’s that feeling that I need to rise to the challenge and push myself further that often helps me achieve my goals, and I couldn’t do that with out some degree of pressure.

So how does this differ from the experience of stress?

Sometimes, when we’re under a lot of pressure, the demands that are placed on us by our situation can exceed our ability to cope effectively. When we reach this point, when we start to feel overstretched or strained by the demands placed upon us, that’s when we begin to drift into the realm of stress.

When trying to manage the challenge of recovery from anxiety, OCD or an eating disorder, being able to recognise the difference between pressure and stress can be a key skill to master.

So next time you’re facing a demanding set of circumstances, take a moment to reflect on what it is you’re facing and ask yourself: is this pressure or is this stress? Can I cope with the demands placed on me, and will those demands help me perform at my best, or do I need to ask for help or take a step back?

It’s good to set expectations for yourself. When we have a goal to work towards, the pressure association with achieving that goal can help us stay on track and fulfill our potential – this is a good thing! But if the demands we are placing on ourselves are exceeding our ability to cope, then stress and even anxiety can soon start to dictate our mood.

That’s when we need to learn to assert ourselves, and say ‘no!’

Tom. S

Learning to Face and Float

Managing a panic attack is daunting for anyone – even those of us with years of experience and recovery practice under our belts. But throughout my own recovery from panic disorder I have returned again and again to one particular technique that has always offered great power and flexibility – helping me continue to live life to the fullest even when the challenge of anxiety has loomed large.

I first discovered the technique of ‘facing and floating’ whilst reading the world famous books of Dr Claire Weekes. Weekes was a pioneer in the treatment of panic disorder and agoraphobia, and the cognitive and behavioural techniques she developed throughout her career were so radically successful that she was even nominated for the Nobel Prize in Medicine for their development.

Her approach to managing panic was to instruct her patients to face towards their panic instead of shrinking from it, and to learn to relax and let the anxiety wash over them until it had run out of steam. For those facing panic attacks for the first time, this approach can seem a little counter-intuitive. But I promise you, it works!

To get your head around the specifics of the ‘face and float’ technique start by thinking about how a person swims versus how a person floats. To swim you have to have all your limbs coordinated and then you have to learn to breath and paddle in time with the water. This is fine when the water is calm, but when the waters are choppy it’s much harder to swim with confidence and keep your head above the waves.

Now floating on the other hand – well you don’t really have to learn how to float! Even a block of wood can float successfully on a choppy sea. All you need to do to float successfully is relax and not get in your own way. You just lie there and let the water take you.

So lets apply this analogy to panic: When panic strikes, do you furrow your brow  and desperately try to paddle against your fears, or do you relax and trust your own body’s ability to float? Next time panic is upon you, why not try doing nothing and letting time pass. Don’t try to fight the panic, don’t grit your teeth and try to ‘tough it out’ – just do nothing. Let the panic come to you. Look at it for what it is – a shift of brain chemicals and a shot of adrenalin. It cannot hurt you! Acknowledge that it’s there and then float on through. Get on with the ordinary things you need to do without worrying about the anxiety for a while.

Dr Claire Weekes often described floating as ‘Masterly Inactivity’, that is:

to stop holding tensely onto yourself,  trying to control your fear, trying ‘to  do something about it’ while subjecting  yourself to constant self-analysis.

When I first heard of this technique, I thought that it sounded like a pretty hard thing to attempt. I mean the last thing you want to do when you’re feeling anxious is embrace your anxiety and invite it in… On the contrary, you want to get rid of it as fast as you can. But it’s this fear of panic, and determination to avoid it at all costs that pushes a panic sufferer to start feeling more and more anxious.

As Dr Weekes explains it,

The average person, tense with battling,  has an innate aversion to …letting go.  He vaguely thinks that were he to do this,  he would lose control over the last vestige of his will power and his house of cards would tumble.

But believe me when I tell you, this will never happen!

In reality, learning to face and float through panic is a key stepping stone to learning to let go of the ‘fear of fear’ – and for a panic disorder sufferer it is most often the fear of fear that causes the most distress.

These days the technique has been recognized as being so successful that it now forms a major component of what psychologists and psychiatrists refer to as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).

If you want to build a life without panic, you can always start by learning to accept that your panic is here to stay (for a little while at least). Maybe at the moment it still has the power to frighten you, but it certainly can’t hurt you. So stop struggling and battling against it – let it be and simply float.

Many of Dr Claire Weekes books on anxiety are still in print, and you can order them through your local bookshop, or check out her website at www.claireweekes.com.au